Which is Better: Pre-or-Post Workout Noms?

There’s plenty of argument in both directions. My favorite advice involves chocolate milk post-workout, but that’s perhaps just me.

I stumbled across this article when I was searching for further advice on the topic, since I’ve recently (about 18 hours ago) decided to take up running in the mornings. Today, I admit, I didn’t eat before my… activity. (I hesitate to call it a run, since I’m sure I didn’t actually run more than a quarter of the whole mile track.) In retrospect, maybe I should have. The article points out that morning exercise often comes after something like a 10-hour fast. You’re running on fumes, the article says. I wonder if that might have anything to do with my exhaustion afterwards?

On the other hand, it is recommended that you allow some time to digest before you embark on your exercise routine, since activity directs blood flow away from your digestive system, which can cause problems. How early do I have to get up and eat before I can work out? Will I have to start getting up at 5:00 a.m. for a 6:30 jog? Because I barely managed to drag myself out of bed by 6:15 today. I imagine it will get easier, but how much of that will be ‘getting used to’ the schedule? How much of it will be eating right? Perhaps time will tell. Until then, I could go for a banana…

Maybe, some day, Oatmeal and I will get along.

Yesterday, I mentioned a long-standing feud that I have with Oatmeal. I don’t like oatmeal. I have never liked oatmeal, but I have to eat it because it’s healthy.

For the longest time, the mere sight of cooked oatmeal was mildly nauseating. I could handle oatmeal baths, oatmeal raisin cookies, no-bake cookies… But a regular bowl of oatmeal? Perish the thought. I made it a point to try it every few years. Before this week, the last time I tried oatmeal was three years ago, sitting down for a bowl of oatmeal at Starbucks when the shop in my school had a morning sale on it for the winter. I put all of the provided nuts, fruits, and brown sugar into it, plus some more sugar, and a little milk. I think I was trying to make it into an oatmeal cookie.

But I failed, and only choked down three or four bites before I gave up and, hating myself for wasting food, threw it away. Unwilling to repeat the embarrassing mistake, I avoided oatmeal like the plague for a while yet. I only purchased the Oat Revolution packets on the condition that my roommate would, should I discover that I found it entirely unpalatable, eat the rest for me.

Fortunately, with the help of some Kashi cereal for texture, I managed to choke down the first bowl. It was horrible, mostly because I made it in too shallow of a bowl, so it got weirdly crusty and tough. Recognizing my mistake, I didn’t entirely give up, but it was a few days before I tried again, this time in a smaller bowl. I added a half cup of dried berry mix I had gotten at Wal-Mart for that very purpose, and managed to eat the entire bowl with slightly less gagging.

I doubt I will ever truly enjoy it, but since oatmeal is one of the healthiest, most filling hot breakfasts you can find, I will continue to seek out ways to make it edible for me. Here is a list of ways I’ve found so far:

  • Add dried fruit, like cherries, blueberries, cranberries, raisins, and such.
  • Add fresh fruit, like diced apples, which hold their crunch well enough in the mush.
  • Add granola or cereal to oatmeal after cooking, to add texture and give you something to bite into.
  • Blend it into a smoothie.

Okay, I haven’t tried the last one, but I’m considering it. I’ll let you know how that goes!