Which is Better: Pre-or-Post Workout Noms?

There’s plenty of argument in both directions. My favorite advice involves chocolate milk post-workout, but that’s perhaps just me.

I stumbled across this article when I was searching for further advice on the topic, since I’ve recently (about 18 hours ago) decided to take up running in the mornings. Today, I admit, I didn’t eat before my… activity. (I hesitate to call it a run, since I’m sure I didn’t actually run more than a quarter of the whole mile track.) In retrospect, maybe I should have. The article points out that morning exercise often comes after something like a 10-hour fast. You’re running on fumes, the article says. I wonder if that might have anything to do with my exhaustion afterwards?

On the other hand, it is recommended that you allow some time to digest before you embark on your exercise routine, since activity directs blood flow away from your digestive system, which can cause problems. How early do I have to get up and eat before I can work out? Will I have to start getting up at 5:00 a.m. for a 6:30 jog? Because I barely managed to drag myself out of bed by 6:15 today. I imagine it will get easier, but how much of that will be ‘getting used to’ the schedule? How much of it will be eating right? Perhaps time will tell. Until then, I could go for a banana…

Advertisements

Maybe, some day, Oatmeal and I will get along.

Yesterday, I mentioned a long-standing feud that I have with Oatmeal. I don’t like oatmeal. I have never liked oatmeal, but I have to eat it because it’s healthy.

For the longest time, the mere sight of cooked oatmeal was mildly nauseating. I could handle oatmeal baths, oatmeal raisin cookies, no-bake cookies… But a regular bowl of oatmeal? Perish the thought. I made it a point to try it every few years. Before this week, the last time I tried oatmeal was three years ago, sitting down for a bowl of oatmeal at Starbucks when the shop in my school had a morning sale on it for the winter. I put all of the provided nuts, fruits, and brown sugar into it, plus some more sugar, and a little milk. I think I was trying to make it into an oatmeal cookie.

But I failed, and only choked down three or four bites before I gave up and, hating myself for wasting food, threw it away. Unwilling to repeat the embarrassing mistake, I avoided oatmeal like the plague for a while yet. I only purchased the Oat Revolution packets on the condition that my roommate would, should I discover that I found it entirely unpalatable, eat the rest for me.

Fortunately, with the help of some Kashi cereal for texture, I managed to choke down the first bowl. It was horrible, mostly because I made it in too shallow of a bowl, so it got weirdly crusty and tough. Recognizing my mistake, I didn’t entirely give up, but it was a few days before I tried again, this time in a smaller bowl. I added a half cup of dried berry mix I had gotten at Wal-Mart for that very purpose, and managed to eat the entire bowl with slightly less gagging.

I doubt I will ever truly enjoy it, but since oatmeal is one of the healthiest, most filling hot breakfasts you can find, I will continue to seek out ways to make it edible for me. Here is a list of ways I’ve found so far:

  • Add dried fruit, like cherries, blueberries, cranberries, raisins, and such.
  • Add fresh fruit, like diced apples, which hold their crunch well enough in the mush.
  • Add granola or cereal to oatmeal after cooking, to add texture and give you something to bite into.
  • Blend it into a smoothie.

Okay, I haven’t tried the last one, but I’m considering it. I’ll let you know how that goes!

Breakfast Is Important! (But You Know This)

When I was a kid, I loved oatmeal, apparently. Somewhere between my earliest memories and the next time I ate oatmeal, though, something happened. For the last 15 years, I’ve been unable to stomach the healthy, quick, and easy breakfast option, and it’s taken its toll. Every time I see oatmeal, and read the articles touting its well-known and bountiful health benefits, I got very sad.

Then, I discovered an oatmeal called Oat Revolution. It is single-serve packets with the measuring utility built-into the packet for the water, and it’s simply microwave and eat. It was simple, it was cheap, and I decided to give oatmeal one more try.

I still don’t like it… But it doesn’t make me gag anymore, which is a bonus. I just need to add a granola on top to give it a texture other than “mush.” It’ll be added to my “quick and easy breakfast” list, since I’m making an effort lately to eat something—anything—before I leave for work nowadays. Here are some of my quick and easy breakfasts, just little things so you don’t walk out the door hungry:

  • Scrambled egg (In the microwave!) on toast: Take a bowl and spray it with a little bit of cook spray. Scramble a single egg into the bottom, and add any herbs or spices you prefer in your eggs. Microwave it for 45 seconds, then check to make sure it’s cooked. Most microwaves will finish cooking the egg within a minute, so experiment with yours to find the right time. While that’s going, make a slice of toast, and butter it. After the egg is done, slide the egg out of the bowl onto the toast, and maybe top with cheese, salsa, or whatever else suits your fancy (My roommate likes ketchup). You can eat this easily on your way to the car, and it gives you a bit of carbs, a bit of protein, and depending on the bread you pick, some fiber and whole grains as well! Think-cut and Texas-style toast works well for breads, but English muffins, bagels, and rolls are all good substitutes.
  • Oatmeal: The oatmeal I mentioned above isn’t the only instant oatmeal out there. Oatmeal and a banana or an apple will give you the energy to make it through if you have to walk out the door with only five minutes to eat something. If you have more time, you can dress it up in a hundred different ways, with fruit, milk, jams/jelly, and so on, but the basics will give you a good boost on an empty stomach.
  • Bananas!: A banana has a ton of vital nutirents, plus fiber to help fill you up. If you work out in the morning, grab a banana to help you through it. They’re cheap and easy, and if they start to go brown, you can peel them, freeze them, and use them in smoothies! When I lived in Japan, bananas were just about the only fruit I could afford, so I got used to eating them frequently, and I came to love the little yellow energy boost.
  • Granola Bar and Peanut Butter: Another quick carb-and-protien morning combo is granola bars (I like the Nature Valley crunchy Honey and Oat ones) with peanut butter on top. You can sprinkle some cinnamon on the peanut butter, or some dried fruit, like cherries, blueberries, cranberries or raisins. A sliced banana is also awesome on top, and the whole think only takes a minute and a half to put together. This one is also perfect for eating on your way out the door.
  • Bowl of Cereal: The old standby, a bowl of cereal, can be eaten in bites between putting on your shirt and putting on your shoes. There are plenty of healthy, ineexpensive options. Look at the store brands, and bargain brands like Malt-o-Meal, whose cereals are often almost identical to the expensive, brand-name ones. Compare labels and find what you’re looking for, then top it with skim milk, almond or soy milk. Unless you drink the milk afterwards, you don’t really notice the difference!

These are only a tiny, tiny few of the hundreds of thousands of options for the all-important breakfast, but they are probably some of the most common, and easiest morning meals. Don’t miss the most important meal of the day just because you’re in a rush!