Creamy Chicken Sandwich [Recipe]

I feel like I’ve been running out of food lately; when in fact I’m just running out of prepared things. I’m going through an ‘I hate cooking’ kick, which makes eating healthy a bit more diffcult.

I’m not sure today’s lunch qualifies as ‘healthy,’ but it was certainly delicious! It was worth the time to cook and clean up, in my opinion, so I’m going to make note of it here. Continue reading

Quick-And-Easy, Even If Not Truly Healthy

In my family, we have a traditional dinner, which is polish sausage, cottage cheese, sliced onions, and roasted/fried potatoes. I’m not sure we all agree on what it’s called, but despite the differences in nomenclature, we are all well aware of what it is and how to make it. Fortunately for me, it takes about ten minutes, and fills me up for the rest of the afternoon, while also filling the little hole in my heart that comes from being so far away from home all the time.

First, I split in half and, in a non-stick pan, heat up a two ounce portion of polish sausage (one serving–and much less that you’d eat of it around the table with everyone there!). Then, adding no more than a tablespoon of butter, I fry some diced potatoes (Sliced is traditional, but I’ve yet to successfully make sliced fried potatoes edible) in the grease that came off the sausage. While that’s going, I slice up half a small onion, drizzle with oil and vinegar, and pepper, and portion out a 1/2 c. serving of small-curd cottage cheese (No low-fat gunk for me, thanks. 4% milkfat minimum!).

Pile everything on the plate, and enjoy! (I’ll add a picture as soon as I have it again, which given how hungry this thought has made me, might be as soon as tonight!)

Maybe, some day, Oatmeal and I will get along.

Yesterday, I mentioned a long-standing feud that I have with Oatmeal. I don’t like oatmeal. I have never liked oatmeal, but I have to eat it because it’s healthy.

For the longest time, the mere sight of cooked oatmeal was mildly nauseating. I could handle oatmeal baths, oatmeal raisin cookies, no-bake cookies… But a regular bowl of oatmeal? Perish the thought. I made it a point to try it every few years. Before this week, the last time I tried oatmeal was three years ago, sitting down for a bowl of oatmeal at Starbucks when the shop in my school had a morning sale on it for the winter. I put all of the provided nuts, fruits, and brown sugar into it, plus some more sugar, and a little milk. I think I was trying to make it into an oatmeal cookie.

But I failed, and only choked down three or four bites before I gave up and, hating myself for wasting food, threw it away. Unwilling to repeat the embarrassing mistake, I avoided oatmeal like the plague for a while yet. I only purchased the Oat Revolution packets on the condition that my roommate would, should I discover that I found it entirely unpalatable, eat the rest for me.

Fortunately, with the help of some Kashi cereal for texture, I managed to choke down the first bowl. It was horrible, mostly because I made it in too shallow of a bowl, so it got weirdly crusty and tough. Recognizing my mistake, I didn’t entirely give up, but it was a few days before I tried again, this time in a smaller bowl. I added a half cup of dried berry mix I had gotten at Wal-Mart for that very purpose, and managed to eat the entire bowl with slightly less gagging.

I doubt I will ever truly enjoy it, but since oatmeal is one of the healthiest, most filling hot breakfasts you can find, I will continue to seek out ways to make it edible for me. Here is a list of ways I’ve found so far:

  • Add dried fruit, like cherries, blueberries, cranberries, raisins, and such.
  • Add fresh fruit, like diced apples, which hold their crunch well enough in the mush.
  • Add granola or cereal to oatmeal after cooking, to add texture and give you something to bite into.
  • Blend it into a smoothie.

Okay, I haven’t tried the last one, but I’m considering it. I’ll let you know how that goes!

Quick, Short-Wait Refrigerator Pickles!

A few days ago, I posted about testing out a pickle recipe I found at Tasty-Yummies.com. I made the pickles three days ago now, and my roommate and I finally cracked open a jar and had at them.

First, let me say that I am thoroughly impressed with myself. Neither of us died of food poisoning, which is what I was afraid of. I’ve never made anything like that before, so I was quite pleased when they turned out perfectly flavorful and sour, with a nice crunch and everything!

My next step is to make a huge batch of pickles, in properly large mason jars, to give away as presents for the fall!

If you have ever wanted to make pickles, I highly recommend this recipe. It took me all of ten minutes to make the brine, and I took more time cutting the cucumbers than I took actually distributing the brine over the four jars I used. Beth over at Tasty-Yummies.com says that this brine goes well with lots of veggies, from carrots to cauliflower. I haven’t tried those yet, but that might have to be next!

Excuse Me, My Nerd Is Showing.

I got involved in a discussion recently regarding the frequent comparisons between Harry Potter-style Potions, and either Chemistry or Cooking. I’m of the opinion that it is more akin to Chemistry–where something small could make things go horribly wrong, but my debate partner maintained that it was more like cooking–an art–that could come out good or bad, with degrees in between.

Well, we see enough of Neville utterly destroying cauldrons, but I also admit to once destroying a pot (and almost our glass cook top) while trying to boil water (I was 12. Shh.). Nevertheless, food rarely explodes (half-boiled eggs in microwaves hardly count) and you generally don’t cook up Veritaserum in your kitchen. In a chemist’s lab, however, we’ve gotten things like aspirin (Pepper-Up Potions?) and anti-venom (Beazors?).

Severus Snape himself describes Potions-making as a “Subtle science and exact art,” so in deference to the Potions Master, I will concede that it is both? That leaves us with no simple muggle metaphor, though, which makes writing fanfiction far more wordy than it needs to be.