Creamy Chicken Sandwich [Recipe]

I feel like I’ve been running out of food lately; when in fact I’m just running out of prepared things. I’m going through an ‘I hate cooking’ kick, which makes eating healthy a bit more diffcult.

I’m not sure today’s lunch qualifies as ‘healthy,’ but it was certainly delicious! It was worth the time to cook and clean up, in my opinion, so I’m going to make note of it here. Continue reading

My Favorite Wonder Fruit/Veggie: The Amazing Tomato!

I could sing the praises of tomatoes until I’m blue in the face, to be honest. Fresh off the vine, canned, baked, sauteed, stewed, raw–it doesn’t matter. Tomatoes are my best friend ever (no offence to my human best friends. But I can’t realistically sustain myself on your flesh. You don’t reproduce fast enough). It doesn’t hurt that they are loaded with antioxidants, vitamins, and other nutritional goodies.  That website has a good overview of everything, plus a long list of resources if you’re curious about looking into the studies themselves.

Here are a few of the many ways I like to eat my delicious red (and yellow and orange!) treasures:

  • Diced up and sauteed with olive oil and pepper over pasta. I don’t even need a real sauce, usually–a whole small tomato per serving of pasta is usually about perfect.
  • As hot soup with a hot sandwich. Tomato soup is perfect with grilled cheese, grilled ham and cheese, grilled turkey and cheese, Reubens, and so on. I make it myself sometimes, but usually I just go for the canned version with the least additives and no HFCS. Remember the rule of thumb: If you can pronounce everything on the label, and know what it does for the food, you’re usually alright.
  • Sliced, drizzled with olive oil and cracked pepper, with some mozzarella. One of my favorites to take for lunches, this is wonderful with some of the lower-acid heirloom tomatoes, since you’re eating them straight!
  • In just a big pile of sauteed veggies. I often will pull out a pan and, for dinner, saute up a pile of frozen veggies. I almost always add tomatoes to this instead of any sort of stir-fry sauce. Depending on the veggies, I top it with some cheese and serve it with sourdough bread, if the supermarket recently had any on their day-old rack.
  • Stuffed with ricotta and italian breadcrumbs. One of my favorite ways! I discovered the recipe by trial-and-error, so I’ll have to make them again before I can post it (The horror!), but you hollow out the tomatoes, reserve what flesh you take out (I toss most of the seeds usually), and mix it together with ricotta and some italian breadcrumbs in a food processor (I used a manual one. I don’t know if that makes a difference). Bake until the skins start bursting. Top with a white cheese (I used mozzarella. I really like mozzarella.) and serve! Magnificent.
  • Canned Diced, mixed with Velveeta. Okay, this isn’t remotely healthy, but I’ll be darned if it isn’t the most delicious party dip in existence!
  • With Cucumber and hummus on a sandwich. My favorite sandwich, of which I eat three or four a week, is this one. Sometimes I add sliced turkey, or spinach, or something, but most often not. Red Pepper Hummus (or garlic, or lemon, or whatever else strikes your fancy), topped with thinly sliced cucumbers and tomatoes, on a good whole-grain bread, with a spot of italian dressing. It’s delicious, quick, and easy!

I go through four or five tomatoes a week, usually, and perhaps my tooth enamel won’t thank me for it, but I can’t bring myself to remotely regret the deliciousness. What are some ways I’ve missed, to use tomatoes?

Brown-Bag Lunches

Working part-time is a blessing and a curse. On the one hand, you have so much other free time to fill. On the other hand, you don’t have any money to, for example, buy lunch near your work when you have those long days. Packing your lunch is the most economical thing to do even when you CAN afford to buy a panini from the cafe, though, so here’s my recipe for brown-bag bliss:

I’ve found that the best packed lunches are actually a variety of more snack-like items. Pick one or two from each list, and I guarantee you’ll have a complete lunch that will fill you up, for even less than Applebees’ $7.99 lunch combos.

Protein:
Ham and Cheese roll-ups–Thick-sliced deli ham, with a thin-sliced deli cheddar, colby-jack, or swiss. Two or three roll-ups should be plenty.
String Cheese–There’s plenty of interesting options out there now! Kraft has flavored string cheese, with things like Tomato-Basil Mozzarella and Cracked Black Pepper Mozzarella. String Cheese isn’t just for kids anymore!
Hard-boiled Eggs–One or two, with a dash of black pepper, or salsa, or whatever else you like your eggs with, pack perfectly! Peel them and put them in a small Tupperware container; they have some at my dollar store that are perfectly sized for two eggs.

Carbs:
Wheat Thins–A single serving size of wheat thins (or Triscuit, or any other whole-grain cracker) pairs well with sliced cheese (or the cheese sticks I mentioned!).
Cold pasta salad–Or hot, for that matter, if you want to throw it in the microwave. Watch your portion sizes, and make sure it’s a side-serving, not an entree, unless it’s more veggies than pasta. Creamy pasta salads should be accent foods.
Whole grain sandwich–My favorite has hummus, tomato, and cucumber on it, which possibly also qualifies it for the veggies portion of the lunch!
Leftover Rice–I make for myself the Zatarains Rice Pilaf for dinner some nights, but I obviously can’t eat a whole box in one sitting, so I portion the remainder out to take to work the next few days. It microwaves hot in a minute or so, and is very filling.

Fruits and Veggies:
Carrot sticks (Or celery, or cucumber, or bell pepper!)–Don’t bother with more expensive pre-cut baby carrots. It only takes a few minutes to cut a 3-lb bag of carrots into large matchsticks. Portion them out into snack baggies, and collect the snack baggies into the original carrots bag. Five minutes of prep-work gives you an excellent grab-and-go snack! Pair with ranch dressing or (my favorite) hummus.
Apples, oranges, bananas, or pears–All of these are easy to grab and eat on the run, if your break involves walking anywhere.
Tomatoes, olive oil and pepper–A little on the messier side of the spectrum, this is nevertheless a delicious, ‘gourmet’ addition to lunch. Pack it in a small Tupperware, since a baggie will be difficult to eat out of. If you want to add to it, they sell pearl-sized mozzarella balls that you can add a tablespoon or so of. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and fresh-cracked black pepper is best, but you can make do in a pinch.

A little of everything is the best way to fill you up and get a balanced diet. The vitamins in fresh fruits and veggies, plus the energy from the combined carbs and protein, will keep you going for hours longer than a microwave ‘lean-cuisine’ meal, and it’s even cheaper than going to McDonalds!

Breakfast Is Important! (But You Know This)

When I was a kid, I loved oatmeal, apparently. Somewhere between my earliest memories and the next time I ate oatmeal, though, something happened. For the last 15 years, I’ve been unable to stomach the healthy, quick, and easy breakfast option, and it’s taken its toll. Every time I see oatmeal, and read the articles touting its well-known and bountiful health benefits, I got very sad.

Then, I discovered an oatmeal called Oat Revolution. It is single-serve packets with the measuring utility built-into the packet for the water, and it’s simply microwave and eat. It was simple, it was cheap, and I decided to give oatmeal one more try.

I still don’t like it… But it doesn’t make me gag anymore, which is a bonus. I just need to add a granola on top to give it a texture other than “mush.” It’ll be added to my “quick and easy breakfast” list, since I’m making an effort lately to eat something—anything—before I leave for work nowadays. Here are some of my quick and easy breakfasts, just little things so you don’t walk out the door hungry:

  • Scrambled egg (In the microwave!) on toast: Take a bowl and spray it with a little bit of cook spray. Scramble a single egg into the bottom, and add any herbs or spices you prefer in your eggs. Microwave it for 45 seconds, then check to make sure it’s cooked. Most microwaves will finish cooking the egg within a minute, so experiment with yours to find the right time. While that’s going, make a slice of toast, and butter it. After the egg is done, slide the egg out of the bowl onto the toast, and maybe top with cheese, salsa, or whatever else suits your fancy (My roommate likes ketchup). You can eat this easily on your way to the car, and it gives you a bit of carbs, a bit of protein, and depending on the bread you pick, some fiber and whole grains as well! Think-cut and Texas-style toast works well for breads, but English muffins, bagels, and rolls are all good substitutes.
  • Oatmeal: The oatmeal I mentioned above isn’t the only instant oatmeal out there. Oatmeal and a banana or an apple will give you the energy to make it through if you have to walk out the door with only five minutes to eat something. If you have more time, you can dress it up in a hundred different ways, with fruit, milk, jams/jelly, and so on, but the basics will give you a good boost on an empty stomach.
  • Bananas!: A banana has a ton of vital nutirents, plus fiber to help fill you up. If you work out in the morning, grab a banana to help you through it. They’re cheap and easy, and if they start to go brown, you can peel them, freeze them, and use them in smoothies! When I lived in Japan, bananas were just about the only fruit I could afford, so I got used to eating them frequently, and I came to love the little yellow energy boost.
  • Granola Bar and Peanut Butter: Another quick carb-and-protien morning combo is granola bars (I like the Nature Valley crunchy Honey and Oat ones) with peanut butter on top. You can sprinkle some cinnamon on the peanut butter, or some dried fruit, like cherries, blueberries, cranberries or raisins. A sliced banana is also awesome on top, and the whole think only takes a minute and a half to put together. This one is also perfect for eating on your way out the door.
  • Bowl of Cereal: The old standby, a bowl of cereal, can be eaten in bites between putting on your shirt and putting on your shoes. There are plenty of healthy, ineexpensive options. Look at the store brands, and bargain brands like Malt-o-Meal, whose cereals are often almost identical to the expensive, brand-name ones. Compare labels and find what you’re looking for, then top it with skim milk, almond or soy milk. Unless you drink the milk afterwards, you don’t really notice the difference!

These are only a tiny, tiny few of the hundreds of thousands of options for the all-important breakfast, but they are probably some of the most common, and easiest morning meals. Don’t miss the most important meal of the day just because you’re in a rush!

Quick, Short-Wait Refrigerator Pickles!

A few days ago, I posted about testing out a pickle recipe I found at Tasty-Yummies.com. I made the pickles three days ago now, and my roommate and I finally cracked open a jar and had at them.

First, let me say that I am thoroughly impressed with myself. Neither of us died of food poisoning, which is what I was afraid of. I’ve never made anything like that before, so I was quite pleased when they turned out perfectly flavorful and sour, with a nice crunch and everything!

My next step is to make a huge batch of pickles, in properly large mason jars, to give away as presents for the fall!

If you have ever wanted to make pickles, I highly recommend this recipe. It took me all of ten minutes to make the brine, and I took more time cutting the cucumbers than I took actually distributing the brine over the four jars I used. Beth over at Tasty-Yummies.com says that this brine goes well with lots of veggies, from carrots to cauliflower. I haven’t tried those yet, but that might have to be next!

Cooking with my Roommate

Becca and I became roommates when, after a year in our respective pit-of-doom rooms we called living situations at the time, we both got fed up and decided we would work well living together. Obviously, I had some reservations about living with a friend. They say that nothing ruins a friendship like living together, or road trips. Well. We haven’t gone on a road trip, but living together hasn’t seemed that bad so far, and it’s been almost three months, and while we’ve had days where we can’t talk to one another for fear of blowing something up, we haven’t killed each other yet.

Mostly because, if I killed her, I’d lose my own personal chef.

I truly mean this, too. So far, in the two-months-and-some-change we have shared a kitchen, refrigerator, and and sink, she has made: a fantastic ratatouille (twice!), Eggplant Parmesan, a magnificent dinner with curried chicken and apple-vinegar kale, numerous decadent salads, omelets, cinnamon rolls from scratch, fresh bread from scratch, oodles of delicious sandwiches, smoothies, and more. She says her specialty is baking, though, and admittedly her cheesecake is utterly to DIE for. Whenever Becca cooks, I know I’m gonna get something healthy, and I know she’s going to spend half her time plating the dish, then describing it to me. Eating dinner with her makes me feel like I’m a judge on Iron Chef, it’s amazing! :D

A Picture of Becca's Cheesecake

Finished and plated cheesecake, photographed for a project Becca had at school.

Ramen Salad [Recipe]

Ever since I was a kid, my mom made this ramen salad for us all the time. Potlucks, family gatherings, picnics… Any excuse to make it, because it’s outrageously simple and surprisingly healthy. Olive oil is loaded with good fats, and the health benefits of vinegar have been explored time and again. Cabbage has been shown to have plenty of vitamins and minerals, and sunflower seeds, like olive oil, have a ton of beneficial Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated fats, among other nutrients.

Eaten in moderation as a side dish, this is probably my favorite healthy picnic food!

CynD Smith’s Ramen Salad

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 Head of Cabbage
  • 1 pkg. Oriental-flavored Ramen
  • 1 can Water Chestnuts
  • 1/2 c. Rice Wine Vinegar
  • 1 c. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil (any vegetable oil will work in a pinch)
  • 1 tbsp. Sugar
  • Sunflower Seeds (to taste)

Directions:

  1. Thinly slice and chop cabbage
  2. Crush ramen in package, setting the seasoning packet aside. Throw the crushed dry noodles and drained water chestnuts with the cabbage in a large bowl and toss to mix evenly.
  3. In a cup, bowl, or salad dressing mixer, whisk together the vinegar, oil, the seasoning packet from the ramen, and sugar. Pour over the cabbage mixture, add sunflower seeds, and toss to coat, then serve.

This will keep in the refrigerator for a few days, although actually keeping people from finishing it for that long might be a challenge! This recipe is easily doubled for potlucks and picnics, or for families (My mom almost always made a double batch for my two brothers and I).